Have You Seen Beyonce’s “Spirit” Video??

Okay look…I’m not part of the Beehive and I’m not a big Beyonce fan. I love her music and I’m a supporter but this “Spirit” video for The Lion King movie tho… whew chile!! It’s an uplifting, inspirational song that she sings her heart out on. It’s in reference to Simba becoming King. Lyrics such as “watch the heavens open” is a referencing to when Simba was born and Mufasa was lifting him up in the sky and the light came shining down on him.

The African rooted choreography and even the clothing in the video was beautiful. The song was played at the best time of the movie, when Simba was heading back to Pride Rock to take his place as king. Check out my Lion King Review <—- here.

I love how Beyonce goes back to her roots, OUR ROOTS,  when she is involved in a project, such as her Homecoming documentary on Netflix. She involved the HBCU culture into her Coachella performance, which is black AF! Even though she never got the chance to attend a HBCU due to her career, she made sure to recognize it. With The Lion King, even though it’s animated, it takes place in Africa and Beyonce showcases the dances and somewhat the attire. Leave it up to Beyonce to “woo” us.

Check out the video below!

 

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Why Do We Wear The African Head Wrap?

Many black women wear the head wraps that get in touch with their ancestry and African Roots. Some just wear it for the fashion and when they don’t feel like doing their hair—I’m guilty of that!!!

SO here’s some history:

  • It originated in  Sub-Saharan Africa, which is South Africa.
  • The white race imposed the wearing of wraps as a badge of enslavement during slavery.
  • The stereotype black mammy came along with the head wrap, which is a black woman who is taking care of a white family, like a servant.
  • The enslaved and their ancestors have looked at the head wrap as a helmet of courage that inspired an image of the true homeland (Africa).
  • It’s a uniform of rebellion–signifying resistance to loss of self-definition. The style in which it’s worn is a cultural marker.
  • Different cultures use head wraps, but the difference and significance is black women tie the scarf at the crown of her head, significantly portraying a crown—for Queen.
  • Here are a few ways me and my friends have worn them:
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Brea C.

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Randyy G.

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I think it’s good to know why we do certain things, why we wear certain styles & brands and where these trends originate. Sometimes, people don’t care about the history of what brand they’re wearing or how it came about.  Honestly, I don’t care either, sometimes. However, since it’s Black History Month and I wear these head wraps a lot, along with several other Black Women in this style,  I just wanted to enlighten y’all and myself on the legendary head wrap!!

Sources: ThePatriot.co.zw

Shout out to my friends for being my models!!