The Hate U Give: The Movie vs. The Book

I’m late I know. I seen this movie about 3-4 weeks ago and never got around to writing a review BUT…

I coincidentally stumbled across the book The Hate U Give about a month and a half ago and then found out that this was the movie that I had been seeing previews for. Of course movies never play out how they were written in the book but the movie did a good job of getting 70% close.

First off, the book was beautiful, sad but it’s reality. If you’re unaware of the book, here is a synopsis:

The book is about a teenager named Starr. She stays in Garden Heights, a black neighborhood with crime but she goes to a private school 45 minutes away. She has two brothers and is the middle child, her mom is a nurse and her dad is a former felon who owns the neighborhood market. Starr is riding with one of her childhood friends when they get pulled over by the police. The officer kills her friend in front of her and she is the only witness to tell what really happened. In the midst of all this, there’s the neighborhood’s biggest drug dealer, King who is head of the gang King Lords. King is also/was good friends with Starr’s dad and he’s Starr’s best friend,Kenya, dad.

Image result for the hate u give starr and khalil
hollywoodreporter.com

Starr gets the courage to do a TV interview with her face bleeped out and she reveals too much information about “The neighborhood drug dealer” and of course that narrows down to King. How the topic came up was because Khalil’s mother use to work for King and she owed him money and she was supposed to provide for her family (Khalil and his little brother). Since Khalil stayed with his grandmother and she could only do so much, he started selling drugs to provide for his family and help pay his mother’s debt. King wanted revenge for Starr “snitching” even though she didn’t say any names.

In the midst off all this craziness, Starr has to go to school and act like nothing is going on but her white boyfriend (Chris) and friends sense something is wrong. Chris later finds out that she knew Khalil from her TV interview, even though her face was blurred out, he should know his girlfriend’s demeanor right? Starr’s friends found out because  they use to attend her old birthday parties that Khalil would go to and her friend stumbled across an old picture of all of them and put the pieces together. Starr was really living two lives, one surrounded by entitled, preppy white kids and the other life surrounded  by her people, with a little violence.

Image result for the hate u give starr and chris
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After everything is exposed, the verdict comes out and the grand jury decided that they weren’t going to indict the officer; in so many words, he’s innocent. Haven’t we seen that same story so many times. When the announcement is made on the TV, all hell breaks loose in the community. There was peaceful protest Starr finally decided to make her appearance and let it be known that she was the witness. She gave a heartfelt speech, ending it with a chant “His life mattered” before the police started getting aggressive and throwing teargas. The scene was hectic so her, her big brother and boyfriend decided to escape to her Dad’s store to recuperate from all the tear gas. In the midst of all that, “someone” throws a flamed bottle into the store as Starr and everyone else are locked in. Luckily Starr’s dad came in the nick of time to get them out. All arrows are pointed to King because he was at the scene of the crime laughing with his crew, watching the store burn down. This was one of those moment that community came together and told the police who caused the fire, King. The story has a happy ending, including Starr and her family moving out of the neighborhood AND her dad being able to rebuild the shop.

Now, the movie…

The Tramatic Night

On the night of Khalil’s death, Everything went according to the book until Starr and Khalil kissed in his car in the movie. Not to say it didn’t make the scene better, because it did, but just calling out that, that part wasn’t in the book.

Image result for the hate u give starr and khalil
credit: rogersmovienation.com

In the movie, When the officer pulled them over, Starr instructed Khalil to put his hands on the dashboard because that is what her father taught her, dealing with his past. Khalil was really nonchalant about it of course because as we all think ” I didn’t do anything wrong. Why you pulling me over?” Khalil didn’t listen and then the officer asked him to get out the car. As the officer began to search him, he made some inappropriate comments like “oh you’re trying to score with her tonight” (referencing Starr).  All of that was not in the book.

Where’s Devante?

If you read the book, you would know about Devante, but he was nowhere to be found in the movie. If you aren’t familiar, Devante was one of the King Lords who worked directly for King. He was the guy that Starr’s friend Kenya was crushing on and he was the reason Kenya wanted to fight the girl at the party. Starr first officially met Devante at the basketball court with her brother. It was then that she found out that Devante’s brother was the one shot and killed at the party.

As time goes on, Devante comes in Starr’s dad store seeking help. He stole a couple thousand dollars from King and he needed a place to stay and work, so to help him, Mav (Starr’s dad) hired him on at the store and let him stay at they’re house. This escalated when King somehow found out that Mav was hiding Devante. Of course Mav lied to King but in order to protect Devante further, he send Devante to stay with his brother in law, Carlos. From then on Devante was exposed to a safer and better life UNTIL he decides to go see his brother at the cemetery an some of King’s workers spot him and beat him up. Starr, Seven, and Chris find Devante at King’s house, with the help of Kenya since she stays there as well, and they get him out safely. While in the car, that’s when they find out the verdict that the officer who killed Khalil will not be prosecuted. Then the book transitions into the protest that happens in the book.

They Really Did Move…

In the movie, Starr’s family didn’t move, but in the book they did. Matter of fact they moved before the verdict was announced.

starr and family
bookbub.com

 

The Ending.

At the end of the movie, after Mav gets Starr and Seven out of the burning shop, her mom and little brother show up. As I stated before, King was across the street laughing s the shop burned down and just when they were about to fight, the police showed up. Words were exchanged and then WHOA! The little brother Sekani is holding a gun, pointing it at King. THAT WAS NOT IN THE BOOK and boy did it have my heart beating. Mav had to deescalate the situation and everyone in that moment, even the police, had to self-reflect and come to terms that we need to stop the violence. No one got hurt in the situation this was one of the times that Mav had to fess up and tell the police that King set the shop on fire. He had to protect what was his.

Image result for the hate u give maverick
youtube.com

One of the main things that was in the book and movie was that Khalil loved listening to Tupac and in that brief moment that him and Starr reunited, he told her that THUG LIFE really means The Hate U Give Little Infants Fucks Everybody, hence..The title of the book. That hate you give (teach) your children, they grow up having to life a differently. For example, if a white couple have children and they teach them that black people are worthless and trouble, then those children are going to grow up treating black people without any respect and more importantly stereotyping them, us, ME. On the other hand, if a black couple have children and they teach them that if someone tries to hurt their family, then you must protect the family at all costs, even if it means killing someone, even the police, hence Sekani. Sekani probably felt that his family was in danger so he pointed the gun to protect his family. Luckily he didn’t tho.

Overall, I LOVED the book. The movie was about 70-80% right but it was still good. To add more drama, I wish they would’ve kept Devante in the movie. I loved the message but this is everyday life for Black America; police shooting an unarmed black man and claiming that they feared for their life because they thought the black man had a gun, but it was really a hand brush or a cell phone. Hopefully this movie AND book will send out another message on a deeper level for white america, and even other races who automatically put black men, and black people of that matter, at fault when we are put in situations. We obey, we listen, we respond, but all that doesn’t matter when it’s truly the color of our skins that the police fear.

Also, Rest to the Screenwriter for the film Audrey Wells. She passed away Thursday October 4, a day before the film was released. I know she will be proud of the movie’s success. May she rest in peace!

Tell me what you think of the movie and or book if you seen or read it.

Comment your thoughts below.

Danii Gold out!

 

featured image credit: colorlines.com

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The Face Behind CS Productions

One of my good friends, Charles Staten Jr., from college had the opportunity to be featured in a DreamWorks Animations article. He’s been “From Trouble to Corporate Deals” as the article titles it; by getting his big break from recording a couples wedding dance a year ago in Dallas, TX, whom which are alumni of my school, Missouri State University. He posted the video and within hours he had over one million views and from there it’s been nothing but success. He has since started his own production company “CS Productions” and has been granted other deals and opportunities. I’m glad to say that I know this funny, talented guy.

Check out the article below to learn more about Charles E Staten Jr.

 

charles article picCharles Article

 

Credit for the article: DreamWorks Animation.

 

 

 

“No Disrespect”—but….

Sister Souljah released her debut book “No Disrespect” in 1994 and it relates to women till this day and NOT in a good way.It’s titled No Disrespect but each chapter, someone is getting blatantly disrespected.Even when someone in the book is trying not to be disrespectful, they are being just that.

The book has seven parts about different individuals who have influenced “the character’s” life. The story is being told in first person so her name is never mentioned, so I’m going to refer to her as Character. Character has had different instances of dealing with men and that brought her to having high standards, to sharing with someone’s man. She’s seen her parents go from happy to divorce. Her father lost his job, then started having mental health issues, which led to the divorce. Her father would see her and her siblings every weekend to eventually not seeing them at all. Her mother and siblings  had to move into a low-income neighborhood where they depended on government assistance. Character saw her mother dealing with nothing-ass men just to get by and make ends meet and that brought on a bad perspective she started to see with men.

Character was always different and “enlightened” and as we say it these says “conscious.” She went to college, dated a guy and was even in a relationship with him, only to find out that he was secretly gay. That’s strike two of her bad encounters with men.

Character meets a friend who teaches her how to be throw herself out there to get what she wants–sexually. Character tried it and it didn’t work until, she met a guy a few years older than her. This man was married but she connected with him on an intellectual level and that’s what started her affair with him. She knew from the jump that he was taken but that didn’t stop her, of course the affair had to end because someone found out about it.

The next man that comes into Character’s life goes out of his way to make her his woman. He lied about his lifestyle and she accepted under the condition that he would stop. After dealing with the effects of his lifestyle and finding out he had a wife AND two kids, she was scarred by men internally and mentally and would never love the same again.

By the time character meets the last man in the book, she has the mentality that if her significant other is honest with her, she doesn’t care if there is another woman in the picture, as long as he keeps it real with her. She had came to the conclusion that there is a shortage of black men and black women would have to share regardless, whether they knew it or not so why not be honest from the jump? Men would cheat without us knowing anyhow so why not settle and have two or three women per one man. If that isn’t disrespectful then, I don’t know what is!! Yes Character really thought that would work out, until his girlfriend of almost 10 years said she wasn’t going for it and she wanted her man all to herself and she wasn’t sharing him. All in all, Character let the girlfriend have her man and left it alone.

So giving you that lengthy synopsis, in 2016 “some” women still have that same mindset of sharing a man. By sharing a man, some females are okay with being a side chick. You would never hear a woman say she is a man’s “other” girlfriend and actually being okay with it. So even if there is a shortage of men in the community society, whatever, we as women in general should never settle. Even IF in the end we are going to end up sharing a man because he would be unknowingly cheat on us but we the world wasn’t made for one man to have several women. I know in some countries and even different religions, men have multiple wife, but again that can be part of different religions and I don’t agree with and I guess that’s why I don’t practice it. The God I know made Adam and Eve, not Adam to have Eve and Eva ya know? Never settle, even if it takes forever to find the right one. Don’t be disrespectful.

Check out Sister Souljah’s book “No Disrespect.” It may be 14 years old but Sister has a way with words.