Keisha Mabry Sells out Her First Conference

I went to the mastHER class conference, hosted by the sweet, talented, successful Keisha Mabry. I was able to talk to her about the event and how it came about. Check out the write up below from DELUX Mag!

 

Some people need guidance in life when it comes to creating a brand, finding their voice, networking and other things. Not only is Keisha Mabry the go-to “gal” for all those things but she created an event to help other women fill in their gaps of needs; she called it “mastHER Class.”

She grabs your attention with her quirky high-pitch voice saying “hey FRIEND” and with that signature saying, she used it to network, be memorable and create a conference in a short span. Keisha’s conference SOLD OUT with 250 attendees, on International Women’s Day. She purposely made the event for that Friday March 8. To get more in depth, the mastHERclass is a day-long event of 75-minute masterclasses taught by 12 women in 8 hours in 1 day. Topics are curated, cultivated and catered to the female content creator, entrepreneur and social media influencer. The 2019 topics included getting into speaking, event planning, the business of travel, media production, finding your brand voice, growing an online community, starting an e-commerce business and a few things in between.

Keisha was motivated to create the mastHERclass when she applied to speak at a branding conference for black and brown creatives and was rejected. She says the rejection bothered her because “I had attended the conference the year before and I knew how I could add value.” That rejection inspired to do her own thing instead of “investing in other people’s things and communities without investing in my own,” as she says; she created mastHERclass!

Of course she faced adversity while planning the event; which is expected when you have 8 weeks to pull this off with a head count of 250 women, with a $25k-$30k budget, But after crying, praying and even snacking, she was revived and made it happen! Her advice for facing adversity while planning an event is:

“Expect ish to happen. Expect a sponsor to say yes then say no. Expect the event space to not have everything in place. Expect technology to have a glitch and expect a volunteer or vendor to be dismissed. Things do not go off without a hitch so expect it, plan for it and have a team so you are not trying to handle everything.”

Credit: ashleenicoleartistry

When it came to selecting the speakers for the mastHERclass, Keisha picked them based on the problems she wanted to solve as an entrepreneur and how she wanted to move her business from the idea phase to the MVP phase to the sustainability and growth phase. She already had a network full of amazing women but she also wanted to seek out more women and as she says “the rest is herstory.” She met… click HERE to read the full story.

http://deluxmag.com/keisha-mabry-from-heyfriend-to-a-sell-out-conference-mastherclass/

If you haven’t heard about Keisha Mabry then you need to get to know her!!

 

Danii Gold out! ✌🏾✌🏾✌🏾

Black-ish Addressing Colorism

The TV show Blackish does not shy away from controversial and trending topics, for example Juneteenth, calling the police on black people, black people not knowing how to swim and recently, on last night’s episode they addressed colorism.

If you haven’t had the chance to watch it, here’s what happened: Diane, played by Marsai Martin, took her class picture and she was poorly lighted in the pictured and it made her look darker skinned.

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Now, for the record, she is the only dark skinned family member in the show. Bow, played by Tracee Ellis Ross, is her mother and light skinned; Dre, played by Anthony Anderson is more caramel skinned and plays her dad; Grandma (Ruby), played by Jenifer Lewis, is caramel skinned; Grandpa (Pops), played by Laurence Fishburne, is caramel skinned; Junior,  played by Marcus Scribner, is her older brother and light skinned; Zoey, played by Yara Shahidi, is her older sister and is caramel skinned; and Jack, played by Miles Brown, is her twin brother and is caramel skinned as well. 

Bow and Dre made a big deal about it because they felt that Diane was under looked and lighted poorly and they wanted her group school picture retaken. Diana did think it was a big deal but she was really hiding her true feelings. Junior brought up the fact that the light skinned people in the family are treated differently than the light skin people. For instance, he brought up the fact that Dre is always hard on him and he symbolizes his complexion to being soft, like the jokes going around about Drake being emotional and soft because she sings RnB (as well as rap) and because he’s light skin. Junior also brought up the fact that Jack does weird “sensitive” acts but he gets a pass because he’s not light skinned and “that’s just Jack.” Ruby is always clowning on Bow because she’s mixed/light skin and thinks that she can’t raise her kids right, insulting right? Another point that Junior brought up was that light skinned people get joked on more instead of dark skinned people, specifically in their household; he said what if him and Bow started telling dark skinned joke, and Dre’s response was “Don’t you dare.” Which he has a point. If someone was to joke about my skin tone during the time I was struggling with it, I woulda snapped or got really emotional because there has been a standard, in a sense, that light skin is the preferred skin tone and the only beautiful skin. You had your dark skin artists such as Lauryn Hill that was one of the very few people loved no matter the tone of her skin. 

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Diane ended up revealing that it actually does bother her that she has to get reminded on the daily of her skin, from band aids being a nude color according to lighter skins and not matching her skin, to trying on lipstick and a BLACK sales assocoiate says that color wouldn’t like good on “our skin tone” and suggests her try on a more toned down color, to a random lady saying she was cute for a “dark skinned girl.” WTF IS UP WITH THAT?

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Whether we want to believe it or not, we STILL live in a world that’s full of color stroke people and colorism issues, meaning people past judgment on skin tones. Light skin people are supposedly not as threatening as dark skin people. Light skin men are supposedly softer than dark skin men. Light women are supposedly curve men more and will do you dirty, versus dark skin women are more laid back and outgoing, all SUPPOSEDLY! 

One thing I’ve noticed and it’s been spoken about, is that black men love/fantasize about about having a foreign light skinned woman. Public figures have spoken about it saying “i need her to be light skinned, long hair that’s real” etc. What I don’t like is that the media and people in general act like the only kind of beautiful is light skin women, BUT I will say that the media, social and all, has made it their duty to glorify dark skin women such as Lupita Nyong’O, Viola Davis, Danai Gurira, Aja Naomi King, Yvonne Orji, and many more.

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I use to deal with skin tone issues when I was younger. The guys I liked in elementary and middle school always liked light skin girls. Then when I got in high school, the guys who did seek interest in me only wanted to talk to me because of my big booty.

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The point in all this is: ALL BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL. Yes we hear that a lot but seriously…ALL BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL. Light skin women have been picked on because they are too cute; according to Amber Rose, that happened to her. Dark skin women have been picked on for being to too dark and ugly, as sad as it is. I think we should all learn to stop judging someone by the tone of their skin, EVEN BLACK FOLKS AGAINST BLACK FOLKS. We’ve all been guilty of it, I know I have.

Suggested Post: Obsessed With Complexion 

Tell me your thoughts below.

Dani Gold Out!! 

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What 2018 Has Taught Me

I can honestly say that 2018 was good to me. It’s helped me learn more about myself and it showed me that things don’t always go as planned, as cliché as this sounds. Now I KNOW that things don’t go according to plan but I’m a planner so sometimes the simplest thing that doesn’t go according to my schedule I kind of… flip out. I even plan back up plans for when my original plans don’t go through, sounds crazy right?
With that being said..I took a loss, and it was something that I had never experienced before. I plan so much and try to have soo much control over my life but this loss was something that I couldn’t control. Was I shocked? Yes. Was I sad? Honestly not really. Did it really hit me later and give me a reality check? Absolutely. I am still dealing with it but honestly it’s something that I had been indirectly praying to God about and he pretty much said “bet, say no more.” And BOOM I took a loss lol. I’ll speak more about it later, just not now.
In the midst of dealing with all that, I grew apart from someone who I was once close with. I know I can be sensitive at times and due to me being that way, I try to distance myself from certain situations to prevent getting my feelings hurt. I had been doing this for a while and just “doing me and living my best.” During this situation i was blatantly honest when approached by the close one. Of course that didn’t end well hence we’re not that close anymore, but I was telling my truth and being unbiased. Am I opposed to getting back close to the close one? Absolutely not. But I guess till will tell and time will reveal.
Besides all the bad and self reflecting I went through this year, I went through some good stuff too lol:
I started the year with the internship of my dreams, at radio one in St. Louis. I completed it in April.

 

I finished my classes for my masters in March. I graduated in May.
I traveled to Cabo Mexico with a huge group and it was FUN.
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I met an amazing guy when I really wasn’t looking for anything serious but here we are, 8 months into our relationship.
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I stressed on finding a new job because my health care job that I have been at for three years just wasn’t my passion.
I searched and searched and searched for jobs and finally landed my first big girl job in July, right before my birthday. (What a great early birthday present)
I went back to LA for my birthday and kicked it.
I went to Atlanta twice this year and actually got to enjoy it.

I also walked in two fashion shows this year.

So, it’s safe to say that 2018 has been full of ups AND down but that’s life right? I’m looking forward to what 2019 brings and shows me. 

Comment your thoughts below.

Danii Gold out!

2018: The Year of Black Women Supporting Each Other

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As this year comes to an end, I’d like to bring up the fact that….there has been a lot of support in the black community, specifically with the women. I’ve seen sooooooooo many Black Women supporting each other in group pages. I  was added in The Broke Black Girl group on Facebook earlier this year and it consists of sisters supporting each other with advice about finances, life, accomplishments, YOU NAME IT!

Since I’m a blogger, I was added to a group titled Black Women Who Blog shortly after that which is self explanatory. I’ve seen St. Louis millennials (my age group) take their brand to the next level and its inspired me to get my life together even more. I use to see these same people at networking events and parties and now I’m seeing them put together their own events.

To me, I’ve known and seen St. Louis to be a hating city but after having different experiences with different groups, I believe it varies by career/profession. As far as bloggers/event planners/influencer goes, that community supports each other. I have not experienced an ounce of hating when it comes to my expertise. But after speaking to local artists and Djs, they agree that St. Louis can be a bit on the “not supportive” side when it comes to music and upcoming. I will be the first to admit that when I go out to certain clubs/lounges/etc. they tend to play the same music and those artist are typically not from St. Louis. I did meet a local Dj by the name of Dj CU (shout out to CU) who says he Djs at a couple venues on the weekend and he plays local artist music. I also was a guest on his show titled New Heat 365 and he purposely features upcoming artists on his show just to give them a new platform and some artists aren’t from St. Louis. I like that he uses his platform to help artists, from St. Louis and wherever else. Everyone needs to have that same level of support especially if they have a brand themselves they want to promote. I know a local artist (shout out to B-Wxnda) who I’ve interviews a few times, who says that he went down to Atlanta and was at a club and he just so happened to rub elbows with a promoter and he asked him if the DJ would play his song and the DJ did. Just like that, SUPPORT. The support in other cities, when it comes to music, is better than my hometown, St. Louis.

I believe the level of support depends on the profession. As far as my profession goes, I feel that I get a certain level of supportive, from liking my posts on Instagram to sharing my posts that I post on Facebook, to simply saying hi to me when out in public. I do the same ALL THE TIME just because a click of the share button goes a long way and if I approve of someones brand or know someone who can benefit from it, I will support it/share a post. One key to making yourself known to to other entrepreneurs and showing that you know who they are is speaking up when you see them. Introduce yourself and speak on something you saw on their page or something dealing with their brand. I can be shy and and introvert at times, which is off because with my profession, I NEED to be able to be outgoing lol. BUT I’ve found myself doing it more.

All in all, I love the support that women have been giving each other. Even the men come out to support us. I believe that 2019 will be the year that black men will support each other more than what they normally do. I’m speaking it into existence! As far as us women go, I KNOW that we will come harder in 2019.

Comment your thoughts below.

Danii Gold out!

[DELUX Mag] I’m Dope Because…

Everyone is dope in their own way, whether it’s their accomplishments or their family that makes them dope.

Check out my Delux Story below on being a dope person.

What makes you dope as an individual? By dope, I mean the Urban Dictionary 5thdefinition, which is “adjective: cool, nice, awesome.” If a random person walked up to you on the street and asked you, “what makes you dope?” In translation, what makes you an awesome person? A cool person?

Are you dope because you have your own car and house? Or maybe, you’re dope because you are a mom and can juggle that plus being a student, and business woman?

Perhaps, it’s nothing of a materialistic nature versus an accomplishment and goal you set for yourself. Could you be dope because you beat the odds of becoming a statistic; such as graduating high school and college—dodging teen pregnancy—and even overcoming the negative image of a black person making it out of the hood?

Or are you dope because you’re the first in your family to get a college degree which paves the way for others younger than you in your family—and you vowed never to settle for less?

Your dopeness could be .. click here to read more.

http://deluxmag.com/im-dope-because/

Comment below on what makes you a dope individual.

Danii Gold out!!

 

 

 

 

[DELUX Mag] Tashara Earl and David Morgan brings Battle of the Sexes to STL

Check out the my story below on an event I attended called Battle of the Sexes. It’s a game show that originated in Atlanta by David Morgan and Tashara Earl and they decided to bring the show here. Check out the story below:

Friday night, the game show—Battle of the Sexes made its way to Lowe’s Café to give St. Louis a live preview of the show that originated in Atlanta.  The show was created by Tashara Earl of Fusion Entertainment Management (FEM), along with Chemistry 360.

Originally from St. Louis, Earl decided to bring the show to St. Louis after she received a huge amount of engagement from her social media followers. Along with Earl, host David Morgan of Luhv2Live also appeared to ensure fans would get a true taste of the show.

The concept of the game is to go head to head with the opposite sex on a controversial relationship topics and issues. Since everyone loves a good card game and turn up, before the actual game show started, guests played some Uno, Taboo, and other games, before continuing the night with drinks and a little misbehaving.

Once the show began, it was broken down into rounds. The first round was an agree or disagree game that spark real life questions and scenarios. Various scenarios surrounding marriage, child support and rearing, along with many other relationship topics captivated the audience as excitement and competitiveness filled the room.

It was nice hearing each sides point of view. In some of those questions, each sex agreed or disagree on the same question but ever had their different reason.

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Another game that was placed was called “Bullshit or Believable.” The purpose of this games was for game contestants to shout out a statement—that would either be believable or not. For instance, “Black women who are in a relationship with a white man are less likely to get cheated on.”

Click HERE to see the rest of the story

http://deluxmag.com/tashara-earl-and-david-morgan-brings-battle-of-the-sexes-to-stl/

Tell me your thought on the game and the concept. Would you come to the next Battle of the Sexes event?

Comment below and let me know.